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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Catherine Herridge
Chief Intelligence Correspondent for FOX News Channel
FOXNEWSW 09/02/2013
Herridge continued: intelligence collection say the agency's job is to gather intelligence which informs U.S. policy and that these two programs may in fact been achieving that goal. Faulkner: we're learning about data collection by the drug enforcement administration. So not just the NSA but the DEA. Something that they called the Hemisphere Project. Herridge: This was first reported by "The New York Times" when it received a series of power point slides from a self described whistleblower. As many as
Catherine Herridge
Chief Intelligence Correspondent for FOX News Channel
FOXNEWSW 09/02/2013
Herridge continued: four billion records are affected everyday as these calls pass through the major carriers, including AT&T, then they’re made available to these DEA agents who are working on counter narcotics operations where drug dealers change their numbers very frequently. In some cases AT&T employees reportedly embed with federal agents allowing them to search records as far back as 1987. A justice department spokesman told FOX News says the records are held by AT&T and not by the NSA or the Justice Department but did not dispute the contents of the
Catherine Herridge
Chief Intelligence Correspondent for FOX News Channel
FOXNEWSW 09/02/2013
Harris, the new allegations of spying are based on interviewer American journalist Glenn Greenwald gave to a Brazilian tv show. Speaking in Portuguese. Greenwald who was first to report on the leaked NSA documents in June, explained the new evidence. Greenwald translator: These documents show very clearly that they had already done the spying, because they don't talk about something they intended to plan. They are actually celebrating the success of the spying.
Catherine Herridge
Chief Intelligence Correspondent for FOX News Channel
FOXNEWSW 09/02/2013
According to Greenwald, the NSA program relied on a tool called DNI Presenter, which facilitates access to stored emails as well as content from social media chats and private messages. In this case, it's alleged the Mexican President's e-mails were read, so the U.S. government would know his cabinet picks in advance and the Brazilian President's communications were picked up to track her network of contacts. Those who support the NSA mission of foreign intelligence collection say the agency's job is to gather intelligence,
Catherine Herridge
Chief Intelligence Correspondent for FOX News Channel
FOXNEWSW 09/02/2013
Faulkner: In this story today, Catherine, agents for the Drug Enforcement Administration have had access to even more information than the NSA. Herridge: well, that's right. The sweeping data collection and analysis of information belonging to American citizens took a new turn when
Peter Schaar
Germany's Data Protection Commissioner
KRCB 09/05/2013
Germany's data protection commissioner, Peter Schaar feels slighted. He has been seeking information about foreign surveillance programs since June and has hit a brick wall with Germany's Interior Ministry. It claims Schaar is not entitled to answers. Schaar : I formulated clear questions which I had rigorously checked by lawyers. In particular, I checked how far my oversight extends. I am of the belief such powers are in my remit.
Nicole Perlroth
Cybersecurity Reporter for The New York Times
KRCB 09/06/2013
What we found out is all these accusations that American lawmakers have leveled against Wawei and ZTE in China, basically American lawmakers accused those companies of planting backdoors in their systems allowing the PLA to spy on American corporations. And what we have been finding out in our report is the US government has been doing the exact same thing. So It definitely puts American lawmakers in a bind and it puts American companies in a bind in terms of their global market share. It will be interesting to see what happens over the next coming months.
Nicole Perlroth
Cybersecurity Reporter for The New York Times
KRCB 09/06/2013
Well, the NSA put out a statement today that effectively said that this was a huge setback for them, and that they didn't believe that the story should have been published, that national security concerns outweighed the public's need to know and debate about this topic. Everyone else I've spoken with, however, is very glad we made these disclosures. People in the cryptography community that thought they had won this war with encryption two decades ago are heartbroken. American companies are extremely frustrated
Nicole Perlroth
Cybersecurity Reporter for The New York Times
KRCB 09/06/2013
Perlroth continued: that they continue to make assurance to their customers that their systems have not been breached or compromised and are not handing the government their encryption keys, but i think the public no longer can trust those assurances any more. So I think what we're seeing now is a fundamental lack of trust.
Hari Sreenivasan
Senior Correspondent, Director of Digital Partnerships, PBS NewsHour
KRCB 09/06/2013
The NSA is able to crack through encryption or protective encoding tools that are used by businesses, banks, social media and other kinds of online commerce. For example, it's often assumed that when you purchase a product online or bank online with a secured and locked h.t.t.p.s. connection, you have protected your password and financial information. But the news reports say the NSA can unlock that information. Nicole Perlroth is a cybersecurity reporter with
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